Lost Souls at Lee Williams

The Lost Village
The Lost Village
December 20, 2016
Little Lurkers in Mad Middlebury
Little Lurkers in Mad Middlebury
December 20, 2016

Lost Souls at Lee Williams

Lost Souls at Lee Williams
Lost Souls at Lee Williams

(images:flickr/piedmont_fossil)

Lee Williams High School is located in Kingman, Arizona.  Kingman was named after railroad surveyor Lewis Kingman in 1882 and was a bustling frontier town of miners, railroads and cattle.  The area is well known in Arizona history as being the home of many battles between local native tribes and area settlers after the land was annexed from Mexico in 1848.  Fights commonly broke out of water disputes from nearby springs.  A fort was built to protect the miners and cattlemen from attacks.

Fast forward to the 20th century when Lee Williams High School was built on the former site of the Old Pioneer Cemetery.  The cemetery housed the residents of Kingman who had passed on since the time of mining, ranching and railroading.  In 1944, before the land was repurposed, the site owners offered to relocate all of the existing plots and bodies.  Unfortunately, they were charging $45 per person to remove the remains, nearly $600 per person by today’s standards.  As a result, many of the bodies remained and were left unclaimed.

The football field covers most of the old cemetery lands, including bleachers and a memorial stone honoring the nearly four hundred settlers who were interred in the cemetery.  They included ranchers, miners, railroad men, and members of the Hualapai tribe.  Unfortunately, while the trenches were being dug behind the bleachers, workers uncovered eleven sites and seven coffins.  They also found artifacts like cufflinks, brass nameplates, medallions, and other jewelry.

Lost Souls at Lee Williams

(images:flickr/tigerlexxi)

Unsure what to do, the contracting manager contacted a local tribe for a blessing.  The chief also blessed the men who had stumbled across the graves, warning them that disturbed ghosts could manifest and “follow” the men.  Despite the blessing, there are a barrage of stories surrounding the area, often suggesting that the displaced souls were displeased with their final resting place being paved over.  Reports commonly describe ghosts showing up at events and in local areas, usually dressed in prairie gowns or time wear.

Many other reports involve feeling chills or unexplained cold spots, especially throughout the high school.  There are certain areas no teacher or student dare go.  One is an odd, narrow passageway with a half size door.  It leads into a windowless chamber, eerily resembling a tomb.  It is not used and no one knows what the tiny chamber is for, but it was explicitly included in the building plan.

Other stories commonly originate from workers and staff.  They hear knocking or footsteps, glasses spill by themselves, lights flicker on and off, and alarms, hand dryers, and metal detectors commonly activate from unseen stimulus.  Staff reports hearing footsteps behind them and feeling the odd sensation of being followed, only to turn around and see no one there.  They hear voices, mumbling, and children’s  laughter, although some say they disappear when commanded to “go home!”  Even more creepy, staff have reported a little girl who appears and attempts to convince them to play, even sometimes leaving behind a ball.  Finally, students and staff have even reported seeing a man in a bowler hat and a long coat who lurks around the school and nearby areas.

Megan Borchert
Megan Borchert
Lover of all things unusual, Megan is a staff attorney for the state of South Dakota. When she's not stuffed in an office writing case synopses, you can find her at home with her army of Schnauzers, snuggled up with some strong wine and a good book.

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