Ghostly Greyhounds and Haunted Hibbing

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Ghostly Greyhounds and Haunted Hibbing

Ghostly Greyhounds

The Greyhound Bus Museum was established in 1989 in Hibbing, Minnesota.  Hibbing is the birth place of the American bus industry.  Minnesota hosted the first bus line, running from Hibbing to Alice in 1914.  The mode of transportation was especially popular because of the minors.  As the miners supported the mass transit industry, the Greyhound operators quickly became millionaires.

(images:buses-international/flickr)

(images:buses-international/flickr)

The original museum started in a beat up old parking lot and featured about a dozen buses.  The most popular was the 1914 Hupmoble.  Visitors could wander the small yard and peek in the historical buses and catch a glimpse of where hundreds of people traveled all over the country.  In a small building, visitors could also look through display cases and see badges, uniforms, and models.

Some of the most popular displays allow guests to pose as a Greyhound driver for a unique photo opportunity.  Besides being able to take a seat on the infamous buses, there is a size 28 Greyhound driver hat that was worn by none other than childhood icon Mickey Mouse.  Another big feature is the 1987 film called “Go Greyhound”.  Guests can watch the movie while sitting on actual seats from the Greyhound buses, sitting in a room painted to resemble the inside of a bus.

In 1999, the museum got a fresh start.  After a change in funding, the museum was moved in re-opened.  This time, at 1201 Greyhound Boulevard, the collection of seventeen buses could be housed completely indoors, away from the elements.  The buses were restored and the memorabilia showcasing the history of bus transportation in America was placed in more engaging exhibits, attracting even more visitors.

Unfortunately, some of the visitors of the Greyhound Bus Museum in Hibbard, Minnesota were not the kind who paid admission.  Soon after moving the museum, tools would come up missing.  Security men would look for them all night, just to have them show up in another spot, with no explanation for their moving.

(images:xjoehallx/flickr)

(images:xjoehallx/flickr)

Tour guides and visitors even described seeing noises and shadows moving between the buses.  Many times they were reported to be moving inside the buses.  They seemed to be most attracted and active on the Scenic Cruiser 4501.  That bus also seemed to have issues with the doors and windows.  The windows of the buses were closed, but doors were left open so guests could tour them at their leisure.  After a particularly active day, tour guides would find all the windows open and they would be unable to get the doors open.

There was also an apparition of a young girl, estimated to be about eight or ten.  She was seen, sporting a blue sundress, often wandering amongst the buses.  The local police were even witness to the girl, often seen around five in the morning.  Paranormal investigators who investigated the Greyhound Bus Museum also communicated with the girl on various pieces of equipment.

No one knows where the paranormal energy comes from, but some estimate that the activity is tied to a bus or other memorabilia.  Other rumors circulate that the land was once part of a quarantine camp in 1918 for yellow fever.  Bodies were often disposed of from the camp to the Hibbing Cemetery next door.  Some also suggest that the energy comes from dirt moved from the Rhoad Hospital dirt used to build up the area.  Either way, this museum never has to worry about having people to entertain.

Megan Borchert
Megan Borchert
Lover of all things unusual, Megan is a staff attorney for the state of South Dakota. When she's not stuffed in an office writing case synopses, you can find her at home with her army of Schnauzers, snuggled up with some strong wine and a good book.

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