Bridalveil Fall Trail

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Bridalveil Fall Trail

Bridalveil Fall Trail

Bridalveil Fall trail is a half mile trail located in Yosemite National Park in California. The trail leads you directly to the gorgeous, Bridalveil Fall. This majestic waterfall is a whopping 620 feet of beautiful, cascading water. It’s waters flow year round, but the amount of falling water changes with the seasons. In spring and summer the water rages, due to the melting snow. In the colder seasons, when the flow is light and the wind is blowing, the water seems to not touch down at all. The wind is somewhat of a constant thing around this waterfall. The Ahwahneechee called it Po-ho-no, meaning “evil wind.”

[image:TedHolm/flickr]

[image:TedHolm/flickr]

Po-ho-no, The Ahwahneechee Legend

The legend states that there was a young Ahwahneechee woman who was either gathering berries or materials for basket weaving near the top of the waterfall. (The details vary depending on which version you read.) She wandered to the edge, entranced by the misty water. Then an unsuspecting wind came up and pushed her over to her watery grave.

The women who were with her saw what had happened and, afraid, they ran back to tell the villagers what had happened. By the time the tribesmen arrived, they could find no body. They believed that her spirit was trapped in the water of the fall and that it could only be released once she had lured another innocent victim to suffer the same fate as her.

This dreadful cycle continues to this day. The waterfall has never ceased to take the lives of those who wander too close. Or maybe it’s not the waterfall itself, but those spirits trapped within. The evil wind.

[image:RudyPutrahadi/flickr]

[image:RudyPutrahadi/flickr]

This trail only leads you to the base of Bridalveil Fall, which is still an amazing experience. In the spring, the water can be felt all the way to the parking lot. So be prepared to get wet while walking this trail. Also, try to avoid wandering off path. You might find yourself drawn to the beauty of the water, only to be hurled to your death by the evil wind of the trapped spirits within Po-ho-no.

 

 

 

 

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