Cracking Open Egg Hill

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Cracking Open Egg Hill

Cracking Open Egg Hill
Cracking Open Egg Hill

(images:flickr/yeskoooo)

Egg Hill Church is a historic church located in Spring Mills, centering in Potter Township Centre County in Pennsylvania.  The church lies over twenty acres and was built in 1860.  The traditionally built one story pine building on a stone foundation was added to the National Register of Historic Places in June of 1979.  The church itself is 35 by 42 feet and still stands in the county, despite the fact that services have long since stopped, ending in 1927.

Despite the fact that Egg Hill Church has been standing quiet for nearly ninety years, the site is still a source of attraction for many people, due to the events that caused the decline and eventual decay of the church and its church body of worshippers.  It is a story that the local residents have worked hard to cover up, as the church had been a heartburn for the town, even before the tragic events.

The worshippers and minister at the tiny church, during its peak, were shunned from the local community.  Egg Hill Church is located off an isolated road, far from the local population.  It was the first Evangelical church in the area and was reconstructed in 1860 on the existing foundation when the original structure burned down.  Despite the rough start, the worshippers of Egg Hill Church, although small in number, were faithful to their church and minister.

Unfortunately, despite their faith, there were whispers amongst the worshippers regarding their minister.  It was unheard of to question their proud leader, but the decay of the quality of his sermons was evident, as well as odd behaviors.  He quickly began to start looking ragged and rundown.  His robes were never pressed and his sermons were disorganized.  There was a general sense of unease and discomfort, but still his people worshipped.

Cracking Open Egg Hill

(images:flickr/gruenelf113)

On Halloween in the late 1800s, worshippers gathered together to start another worship service.  The service went on as usual, adults listening intently to the minster’s words and the children playing in the basement.  When it came time for communion, the minister passed around the sacred meal and each parishioner, in turn, took communion.  Within minutes, the first effects were made clear.

The minister had poisoned the offering that he passed around to his people.  One by one they moaned and groaned in agony, sliding to the floor and violently shaking until reaching death.  Once the small congregation had all been still, the minister, who was later determined to be possessed, took them out one by one and laid them in graves he had dug before the service.  After each had been buried, he destroyed the children in the basement before hanging himself from the bell tower by a noose.

Since that time, there have been a number of strange reports regarding the Egg Hill Church and nearby cemetery.  Residents whisper that the spirits of the deranged minister or those of his murdered parishioners, still haunt the church and nearby farms.  People commonly hear screaming or children’s voices, but are unable to locate a source.  A dark disturbed feeling fills anyone who wanders close enough and some even see apparitions, orbs, specters or shadows.  Pentagrams litter Egg Hill Cemetery and the church.  Standing outside the small boarded up church, people have even heard things going on inside- despite being locked and empty.  Weirder still, nearby residents still hear the tower bell ring, despite the fact it has been removed since 2003.

Megan Borchert
Megan Borchert
Lover of all things unusual, Megan is a staff attorney for the state of South Dakota. When she's not stuffed in an office writing case synopses, you can find her at home with her army of Schnauzers, snuggled up with some strong wine and a good book.

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